FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to arrive early for my first appointment?
Yes. Please arrive 10-15 minutes early to fill out any remaining patient forms.
Why should I go to the dentist regularly?
Many people do not see a dentist on a regular basis. They only go when they have a problem. This is known as "crisis treatment" versus "preventive treatment." While these patients may feel they are saving money, it often ends up costing much more in dollars and time. This is because many dental problems do not have symptoms until they reach the advanced stages of the disease process. An example is tooth decay. It is typical to hear, "Nothing hurts... I don't have any problems."
Why does the dentist take X-rays?
Many diseases of the teeth and surrounding tissues cannot be seen when the dentist examines the mouth. An X-ray examination may reveal:
  • small areas of decay between the teeth or below existing restorations (fillings)
  • infections in the bone
  • periodontal (gum) disease
  • abscesses or cysts
  • developmental abnormalities
  • some types of tumors
  • Finding and treating dental problems at an early stage can save time, money and often unnecessary discomfort. X-rays can detect damage to oral structures not visible during a regular exam. If you have a hidden tumor, X-rays may even help save your life. Dentist will evaluate your need for X-rays based on the conditions present in development. There are many benefits to having X-rays taken. Any additional questions or concerns should be discussed with your dentist.

I am afraid of going to the dentist, What can I do?
Fear of the dentist is quite common for many people. Main Street Dental Clinics is well aware of the prevalence of dental anxiety and we are properly trained to work with you in helping you to overcome these fears. You will find we are eager to work with you to make your visits comfortable and pleasant. Asking questions about your mouth and proposed treatment will help to remove fear of the unknown and give you an opportunity to become involved in your dental health. Most importantly, remember that your Main Street Dental Clinics team is eager to work with you, not just on you, in order to achieve a mutual goal - maintaining the health of your smile.
What should I expect during my appointment?
When you first arrive at The Happy Tooth, you will be welcomed by a friendly staff member who will work with you in gathering your medical and dental history. We will examine your teeth and gums, screen for oral cancer, make X-rays of your teeth as needed and complete a TMJ (temporomandibular or jaw joint) exam. If treatment (such as a root canal, braces or oral surgery) is necessary, your dentist will thoroughly explain why it is recommended and the benefits of receiving that treatment. The dentist will also answer any questions you have. If you decide to move forward, our treatment coordinator will discuss fee payment options and set up a treatment appointment so that you can be on your way to happier and healthier teeth.

During regular follow-up visits, we will examine your teeth and gums, screen for oral cancer, thoroughly clean your teeth and make plans for treatment, as needed. We will discuss any pain or problems you may be experiencing and answer any questions you have.
Are payment plans available for my dental treatment?
At The Happy Tooth, we make dental treatment affordable and offer several payment options with our patients in mind. We accept many types of dental insurance and will process your claim upon receipt of your co-payment. The Happy Tooth also offers financing through Care Credit, low interest rate in-office payment plans, Protis dental care program and more.
What causes cavities?
  • Your mouth is a busy place. Bacteria – tiny colonies of living organisms are constantly on the move on your teeth, gums, lips and tongue. Having bacteria in your mouth is a normal thing. While some of the bacteria can be harmful, most are not and some are even helpful.
  • Certain types of bacteria, however, can attach themselves to hard surfaces like the enamel that covers your teeth. If they’re not removed, they multiply and grow in number until a colony forms. More bacteria of different types attach to the colony already growing on the tooth enamel. Proteins that are present in your saliva (spit) also mix in and the bacteria colony becomes a whitish film on the tooth. This film is called plaque, and it’s what causes cavities.
  • When refined carbohydrates or sugars are ingested, these bacteria present in the mouth use the sugar and convert it to acid that dissolves tooth enamel. The acid attacks start immediately after consuming sugars and last for 20-30 minutes.
What should I do during a dental emergency?
Dental emergencies seem to occur at the worst time – during sleep, while at work, or even while traveling. If you experience a dental emergency and you are a patient in our Saint Paul dental office, the best approach is to give us a call right away. We will make every effort to get you in for an appointment quickly.

Letting dental pain go untreated can result in more serious conditions – and even tooth loss.

  • Shout Fpr An Appointment at UDENZ, the nearest available dentist will contact you immediately
What are some signs I should see a dentist?
  • Your teeth are sensitive to hot or cold
  • Your gums are puffy and/or they bleed when you brush or floss
  • You have fillings, crowns, dental implants, dentures, etc.
  • You don’t like the way your smile or teeth look
  • You have persistent bad breath or bad taste in your mouth
  • You are pregnant
  • You have pain or swelling in your mouth, face or neck
  • You have difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • You have a family history of gum disease or tooth decay
  • You have a medical condition such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, eating disorders or are HIV positive
  • Your mouth is often dry
  • You smoke or use other tobacco products
  • You are undergoing medical treatment such as radiation, chemotherapy or hormone replacement therapy
  • Your jaw sometimes pops or is painful when opening and closing, chewing or when you first wake up; you have an uneven bite
  • You have a spot or sore that doesn’t look or feel right in your mouth and it isn’t going away